August 2016 Archived Blog Posts

PART C: Arahant Mahinda as Redactor of the Funeral Ceremony   If we have sought to establish Buddhism in the context of death, and overall life by extension, as Mother/Social Worker, Community Worker, Psychologist, Psychiatrist and Spiritual Guide folded into one, we may wonder as to who migh...
PART B: Discussion:  The Funeral Ceremony  As seen in this paper, Buddhism, as practiced by Sinhala Buddhists in Sri Lanka [1], can be seen to play several roles in the context of death in a family, rolled into one. To begin with, it is Mother, and the compassionate Social Worker, who len...
Homily (Baõa) and Transfer of Merit: Homily: Bana ‘homily’ is the elucidation of the Dhamma, and is the second and closing segment of the transferring of merit. Up to now, solace for the relatives and mourners has come through the personal participation , transferring merit in a...
The Ritual The ceremony at the cemetery may begin with memorial speeches (SEE PICTURE), rounded out by a thank you speech by a family member. This is when the religious ritual begins, this in Pali, the language in which Buddhism was brought to Lanka by Arahant Mahinda (3rd c. BCE), and committed to...
Home to Cemetery: To begin then, it is the custom to keep the dead body at home until disposal, embalmed if kept for a few days. In an urban setting, it may be kept in a funeral parlour, particularly if the dead person is of some social standing, as my father was (SEE PICTURE). [IMG]https://s3.amaz...
How Sinhala Buddhists Cope with Death: Funeral Ceremony as Mother/Social Worker, Community Worker, Psychologist, Psychiatrist and Spiritual Guide Suwanda H J Sugunasiri, PhD In Buddhism, as practiced in Sri Lanka in its earliest form, religion has no place at events marking the stages of life &nda...